Academics MENU

BIOLOGY

The Department of Biology has been designated by West Virginia State University as a "Peak of Excellence" and as a "Program of Excellence" by the West Virginia State University System Board of Directors.
 

The Department has 13 full-time Faculty and over 200 students majoring in Biology.

Mission
The department of Biology exists to provide students with an opportunity to learn about science in general and about the science of Biology specifically. Courses are designed to serve a diverse community of students planning careers in science, medicine, or allied health sciences; planning careers as science teachers; and those with an avocation interest in living organisms.
Curriculum

Undergraduate Level

  • Bachelor of Science in Biology Curriculum
  • Bachelor of Science in Biology Appendix
  • Biology Course Rotation
  • Biology Minor
  • Application for Permission to take: Practicum in Biology, Directed Student Research, Undergraduate Independent Study or Research,  and Undergraduate Library Research

Graduate Level Certificates

  • WVSU Pre-Nursing Certificate
  • Graduate Certificate in Biotechnology
Course Descriptions

Biology undergraduate courses  (Biol)

101.  PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

An introduction to the nature of science through a study of selected principles which characterize the nature of life.  Does not count toward a major in Biology.  Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.

108.  ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY  (3 credit hours)

A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete a group project on a topic in environmental biology, a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, keep a journal, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material.  Local field trips may also be required.  Does not count toward a major in Biology.  Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week.

110.  ECONOMIC BIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

Economic Biology will describe how numerous organisms have influenced our past and will change our future. It will cover the basic principles of biology while emphasizing the economic and social aspects of selected plants, microbes, fungi and animals. A special recitation session devoted to studying science will be scheduled to support those who may have “science phobias”.  Fulfills the General Education Natural Sciences requirement but not a Biology majors’ core requirement. Five contact hours per week.

120.  FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

An in-depth introductory study of the biological sciences for science majors, emphasizing major principles of biology and the nature of scientific research.  Students will conduct an original research experiment during the semester. Counts as General Education Natural Science requirement and General Education Computer Skills unit.  Must be eligible for ENGL 101.  Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.

121.  BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY  (4 credit hours)

An introduction to the branches of the tree of life for science majors.  An emphasis on study of the identification, structure and function of living organisms.  Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.  Prerequisite: BIOL 120

199.  SPECIAL TOPICS  (1 - 4 CREDIT HOURS)

A freshman level course designed for a topic of special or current interest, including televised courses. Prerequisites: as stated for each course.

210.  BASIC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

A basic systemic approach to the study of human anatomy and physiology.  Laboratory experiences integrated with lecture enable students to examine anatomical and physiological phenomena of the human body.  Does not count toward a major in Biology.

241.  INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

An introduction to microbial diversity, medical and applied microbiology, and immunology.  The laboratory includes basic techniques for handling and identifying microbes such as those required by health care professionals.  Does not count toward a major in Biology.  Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or 120.

250.  GENERAL ECOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

General Ecology covers the full spectrum of relationships between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environments, emphasizing the principles of natural selection, adaptation and evolution.  Lab component is comprised of field and laboratory experiments demonstrating fundamental concepts of ecology from the level of the individual to the ecosystem.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 120 and 121; eligibility for MATH 101 or 121.

270.  GENETICS  (4 credit hours)

The nature, biosynthesis and regulation of the genetic material in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.  Mendelian principles, and introduction to population and quantitative genetics, and an introduction to recombinant DNA and genomics will be included.  Laboratory investigation of selected phenomena.  Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and 121; CHEM 106 and 108.

299.  SPECIAL TOPICS  (1 - 4 CREDIT HOURS)

A sophomore level course designed for a topic of special or current interest, including televised courses.  Prerequisites: as stated for each course.

303.  NUTRITION  (3 credit hours)

Consideration of nutrient classification and functions and the relationship of nutritional status to health. Application of nutritional requirements to food patterns.  Does not count toward a major in Biology.

306.  GENERAL ZOOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

This course examines major concepts of zoology at the organismal and organ function levels, and provides the student with an introduction to recent advances in zoology in the areas of animal anatomy, physiology, systematics, reproduction, development, animal diversity, animal ecology, and evolution of major taxa of the animal kingdom. 

Prerequisite: BIOL 121.

310.  CONSERVATION ECOLOGY  (3 credit hours)

This course reviews the evolutionary and ecological bases for the Earth’s biodiversity and its importance to ecosystem function and human welfare.  The causes, rates and patterns of loss of biodiversity throughout the world and the concepts and techniques used in ecological conservation and restoration are reviewed.  Three class hours per week.  Prerequisite: BIOL 250 or permission of the instructor.

320.  ENTOMOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

The taxonomy, anatomy, life history, and measures of control of some of the common insects.  Emphasis is placed on field studies.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisite: BIOL 250.

321.  ANIMAL PARASITISM  (4 credit hours)

This course details the ecological concept of parasitism, utilizing the prominent parasitic species of animals and man.  The laboratory component of the course concerns the identification of species and structures of the important parasites of animals and man.  Lab and field projects dealing with natural and host-parasite systems will also be undertaken.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisite: BIOL 121.

325.  INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

The taxonomy, anatomy, and life history of selected invertebrate groups.  Six class hours per week, including laboratory.  Prerequisite: BIOL 121.

326.  VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

A study of vertebrate animals, with emphasis on their evolution, systematics, ecology, and behavior.  Six class hours per week, including laboratory.  Prerequisite: BIOL 121

330.  VERTEBRATE HISTOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

Microscopical study in detail of the structures, tissues and organs of vertebrate animals and a correlation of these structures with function. Six class hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 121

331.  HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I  (4 credit hours)

An in-depth systemic approach to the study of the human body emphasizing organizational structure, osteology, myology, lymphology, and the cardiovascular system.  Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 120

332.  HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II  (4 credit hours)

An in-depth systemic approach to the study of the human body emphasizing the nervous, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.  Prerequisite: BIOL 331.

341.  MICROBIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

Fundamentals of microbiology, including genetics, physiology, diversity, ecology. growth, and control of microorganisms.  Medical, industrial and environmental importance of microorganisms.  Laboratory includes an introduction to basic microbiology methods, emphasizing bacteria.  BIOL 121, CHEM 105 and 107.

345.  GENERAL VIROLOGY  (3 credit hours)

A consideration of selected prokaryote and eukaryote viruses, their structure, replication and interaction with host cells.  Attention will be given to the contributions virology has made to the understanding of molecular mechanisms in Biology.  Prerequisite: BIOL 270.

347.  IMMUNOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

The basic mechanisms of resistance in host-parasite interactions with emphasis on the molecular basis of immune system functions.  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

350.  EVOLUTION  (3 credit hours)

A course covering the concepts and theories of modern evolutionary biology, including the mechanisms of genetic change in populations, speciation patterns, and geologic change through time.  Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: BIOL 250 or 270.

361.  MICROBIAL GENETICS  (4 credit hours)

Genetic mechanisms of bacteria, including their viruses, plasmids and transposons.  Integration of genetic principles and genetic/molecular tools for understanding biological questions.  Select topics in eukaryotic microbial genetics will be included.  Six class hours per week including laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 106; BIOL 341 and 270.

365.  THE BIOLOGY OF FISHES  (4 credit hours)

This is an introductory course that examines the evolution, morphology, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of fishes.  The course will relate the above subject areas to aquaculture principles and practices.  Six class hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 121.

370.  PHARMACOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

An introduction to the basic pharmacological principles of drug administration, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics.  The therapeutic application of clinically useful drugs is emphasized including appropriate drug selection, toxicities, drug interactions, and side effects.  Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or BIOL 120; CHEM 101 and CHEM 201, or CHEM 105 and CHEM 106; or permission of the instructor.

375.  PRINCIPLES OF AQUACULTURE  (4 credit hours)

An in-depth step-by step study of the principles and practices underlying commercial aquaculture production, aquatic productivity and the levels of aquaculture management.  Practices in the United States will be the primary focus with attention to the world in general.  Six class hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 250.

385.  CELL BIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

The cellular basis for the functional attributes of living systems, laboratory investigation of selected physiological phenomena.  Four credits, six class hours per week.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 270;  CHEM 201; or CHEM 206 and 208.

395.  PRACTICUM IN BIOLOGY  (1 credit hour)

Experience in the preparation of materials and equipment for biology laboratory investigations and experience in practical instruction in the biology laboratory.  Open only to Biology majors.  May be repeated for a maximum of four hours credit.  Counts only as a free elective toward a major in the Department of Biology.  Four clock hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of the instructor and the department chair.

399.  SPECIAL TOPICS  (1 - 4 CREDIT HOURS)

A junior level course designed for a topic of special or current interest, including televised courses. Prerequisites: as stated for each course.

411.  SENIOR SEMINAR  (1 credit hour)

A research experience involving literature search, experimental design, written and oral presentation of project.  Prerequisite: BIOL 385.

430.  EMBRYOLOGY AND ANIMAL DEVELOPMENT  (4 credit hours)

A study of the patterns and processes of animal development at the embryonic, cellular, and subcellular levels.  Six class hours per week, including laboratory.  Prerequisites: BIOL 385 or permission of the instructor.

435.  COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE MORPHOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

A comparative study of the basic architectural plans of the vertebrate body, emphasizing the function and evolution of major organ systems.  Six class hours per week, including laboratory.  Prerequisites: permission of instructor.

440.  FIELD BOTANY  (4 credit hours)

An integrated laboratory study of the taxonomy, ecology and geography of plants with emphasis on the flora of West Virginia.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisite: BIOL 250 or permission of instructor.

441.  PLANT DEVELOPMENT  (4 credit hours)

A detailed study of the role of developmental processes in the evolution, ecology, and domestication of plants, emphasizing the production of morphological diversity in extant and extinct taxa.  Six class hours per week including laboratory.  Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and 270 or permission of instructor.

442.  PLANT GEOGRAPHY  (3 credit hours)

Descriptive and interpretative plant geology, including a survey of the present distributions of major vegetational formations, discussion of the history, development, evolution and significance of their patterns, climatic regions, and composition of the major plant formations.  Prerequisite: BIOL 250 or permission of instructor.

443.  PLANT TISSUE CULTURE  (4 credit hours)

The principles and techniques of culturing plant tissues in vitro for research and horticultural applications.  Six class hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 250 or permission of instructor.

444.  PLANT PHYSIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

This course includes an analysis of the cell biology, biochemistry, metabolism, ecological physiology, and development of plants.  Lecture topics include water relations, respiration, photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, mineral nutrition, plant hormones, plant molecular biology, genetic engineering, and the role of environmental signals in plant development, and the environmental physiology of Mid-Atlantic, mixed mesophytic, deciduous forests.  Lectures will be supplemented with reading in research journals. Laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate basic research techniques as well as the principles covered in lecture.  Six contact hours per week.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 120, CHEM 106 and 108, CHEM 205 and 207.

460.  ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

Microbial functions, interactions, and diversity in natural and man-made environments.  Applications of microbial activities in bioremediation, biodegradation, agriculture, health and environmental biotechnology.  Six class hours per week, including laboratory.  Prerequisites: BIOL 341; CHEM 106 and 108 or permission of instructor.

466.  CANCER BIOLOGY  (3 credit hours)

This course will introduce the student to the biology of tumors.   Emphasis will be placed on the cellular and molecular events that lead to tumor formation and progression to cancer. The course format will be a combination of traditional lecture and seminar.  Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: BIOL 385 or permission of the instructor.

490.  DIRECTED STUDENT RESEARCH  (1 - 4 credit hours)

An independent research topic designed by the student with the assistance of the instructor, and acceptable to the instructor and the chair.  Variable contact hours.  A maximum of 4 credits of BIOL 490 may be counted toward a Biology major.  Prerequisite:  24 hours of Biology plus permission of chair and instructor. 

491.  UNDERGRADUATE INDEPENDENT STUDY OR RESEARCH  (1 - 4 credit hours)

A continuing independent research topic designed by the student with the assistance of the instructor, and acceptable to the instructor and the chair.  Available after fulfilling 4 credits hours of BIOL 490.  Course is graded pass / fail only.  Prerequisite:  permission of chair and instructor.

492.  UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY RESEARCH  (1 - 2 credit hours)

An introduction to library research techniques and to the biological literature.  Staff assigns a topic and supervises the project.  A maximum of 2 credits of BIOL 492 may be counted toward a Biology major.  Prerequisite:  permission of chair and instructor.

499.  SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY  (1 - 4 credit hours)

An in-depth study of special topics proposed by members of the biology faculty.  May be repeated for a maximum of eight credit hours. Counts only as a free elective toward a major in the Department of Biology.  Variable contact hours.  Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor and the department chairperson.

Biology Graduate courses  (Biol)

510.  CONSERVATION ECOLOGY  (3 credit hours)

This course reviews the evolutionary and ecological bases for the Earth’s biodiversity and its importance to ecosystem function and human welfare.  The causes, rates and patterns of loss of biodiversity throughout the world and the concepts and techniques used in ecological conservation and restoration are reviewed.  Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

521.  ANIMAL PARASITISM  (4 credit hours)

This course details the ecological concept of parasitism, utilizing the prominent parasitic species of animals and man.  The laboratory component of the course concerns the identification of species and structures of the important parasites of animals and man.  Lab and field projects dealing with natural and host-parasite systems will also be undertaken.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

550.  EVOLUTION  (3 credit hours)

A course covering the concepts and theories of modern evolutionary biology, including the mechanisms of genetic change in populations, speciation patterns, and geologic change through time.  Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

561.  MICROBIAL GENETICS  (4 credit hours)

Genetic mechanisms of bacteria, including their viruses, plasmids and transposons.  Integration of genetic principles and genetic/molecular tools for understanding biological questions.  Select topics in eukaryotic microbial genetics will be included.  Six class hours per week including laboratory. Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

565.  THE BIOLOGY OF FISHES  (4 credit hours)

This is an introductory course that examines the evolution, morphology, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of fishes.  The course will relate the above subject areas to aquaculture principles and practices. Six class hours per week.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

575.  PRINCIPLES OF AQUACULTURE (4 credit hours)

An in-depth step-by step study of the principles and practices underlying commercial aquaculture production, aquatic productivity and the levels of aquaculture management.  Practices in the United States will be the primary focus with attention to the world in general.  Six class hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 250; graduate status and permission of instructor.

599.  SPECIAL TOPICS  (1 - 4 credit hours)

An in depth study of special topics proposed by members of the biology faculty.  Open to graduate students.  Prerequisite: graduate status and permission of instructor.

605.  ADVANCED ECOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

This course explores the topics at the forefront of basic and applied ecology through current and seminal primary and review literature.  Topics include plant adaptations to stress and environmental heterogeneity, ecosystem nutrient and energy dynamics, processes that generate and regulate biodiversity, the importance of biodiversity to ecosystem function, and the application of this information towards management, conservation and reclamation.  In laboratory, these concepts will be explored using field and laboratory experiments.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

635.  ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY  (4 credit hours)

This course is designed as an introduction to the mechanisms and principles involved in life processes.  A general and comparative approach is used to develop and understanding, in biophysical and biochemical terms have how animals function in order to produce an integrated functioning of the organ systems.  While all levels of organization are considered, particular emphasis is placed on the whole animal and its dynamic organ systems.  The course also emphasizes physiological responses to environmental stresses.  Six class hours per week including laboratory.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

640.  FIELD BOTANY  (4 credit hours)

An integrated laboratory study of the taxonomy, ecology and geography of plants with emphasis on the flora of West Virginia.  Six class hours per week.  Prerequisite: graduate status or permission of instructor.

641.  PLANT DEVELOPMENT  (4 credit hours)

A detailed study of the role of developmental processes in the evolution, ecology, and domestication of plants, emphasizing the production of morphological diversity in extant and extinct taxa.  Six class hours per week including laboratory.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

660.  ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY  (4 credits)

Microbial functions, interactions, and diversity in natural and man-made environments.  Applications of microbial activities in bioremediation, biodegradation, agriculture, health and environmental biotechnology.  Six class hours per week including laboratory.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

666.  CANCER BIOLOGY  (3 credit hours)

This course will introduce the student to the biology of tumors.   Emphasis will be placed on the cellular and molecular events that lead to tumor formation and progression to cancer. The course format will be a combination of traditional lecture and seminar.  Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: Entry into the Biotechnology Graduate Program or permission of the instructor.

671.  ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY  (2 credit hours)

Discussion of current and classical research literature in environmental microbiology, including microbial ecology and evolution, and the interface with plant, animal and medical microbiology.  Two class hours per week.  Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of instructor.

Research
The department's research publications and grants awards are listed in the college of Natural Sciences and Mathematisc page.
CLICK here to go to the Research and Grants page. 
Biology Research Efforts

As an 1890 Land-Grant Institution, West Virginia State University has a Research Mission to address the agricultural, environmental, economic and social issues of the people of West Virginia, the region, and the nation.  Conducting collaborative applied and basic research in the pursuit of new knowledge provides experiential learning opportunities for students and more relevant curricula.

 

  • Dr. Mark Chatfield – Plant Physiology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology
  • Dr. Sean Collins - Social Insect Biology, Insect Population Biology, Ecology
  • Dr. Jonathan Eya - Fish Biology and Nutrition, Aquaculture, Nutrigenomics, Nutritional Immunology
  • Dr. Gerald Hankins - Tumor Biology, Gene Therapy
  • Dr. Rob Harris - Muscle Physiology
  • Dr. David Huber - Environmental Microbiology, Environmental Microbial Genomics, Microbial Diversity, Biofilms, Anaerobic Digestion
  • Dr. Umesh Reddy - Plant Genomics
  • Dr. Tim Ruhnke - Systematics and Evolution of Parasitic Platyhelminths, Environmental Parasitology
  • Dr. Barbara Liedl - Horticulture, Plant Breeding and Genetics, Plant Reproductive Barriers, Speciation, Sustainable Agriculture
  • Dr. Padma Nimmakayala - Quantitative Genetics, DNA marker assisted plant breeding

Research Administration

 

  • Compliance
  • Forms
  • Funding Opportunities
  • Grant Submissions and Administration
  • Indirect Rates
  • Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer
 

Research News

 

  • Latest Press Releases
  • Events
  • Workshops
  • Publications
  • Videos
     
Graduate Theses

Master of Science Graduate Theses

In Vitro Screening of Hibiscus Sabdariffa Extract for Anti-Tumor Properties and Effects on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Proliferation. Christopher R. Racine. Gerald R. Hankins, Advisor. August 2010.
 

Identification of Glucose-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria in a Thermophilic Anaerobic Digester Using Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Tandiwe Mpabanga. David H. Huber, Advisor. December 2008.
 

Understanding Microbial Community Structure and Performance During the Co-Digestion of Stillage Waste and Poultry Litter by a Thermophilic Anaerobic Digester. Deepak Sharma. David H. Huber, Advisor. May 2010.
 

The Role of Mitochondrial Function and Gene Expression in the Growth of Performance and Feed Efficiency of Juvenile Rainbow Trout. Charles F. Pomeroy. Jonathan C. Eya, Advisor. December 2009.
 

The Genus Anthobothrium (Van Beneden, 1850): Molecular Systematics and Description of Six New Species. Leah M. Wilson. Tim R. Ruhnke, Advisor. December 2009.
 

Systematics of Selected Phyllobothriid Species Utilizing the Entire Large Ribosomal Subunit. Joshua Greenwood. Tim R. Ruhnke, Advisor. November 2007.
 

Morophological and Molecular Identification of Three New Species of Paraorygmatobothrium Ruhnke 1994 from Carcharhiniform Sharks. Katherine E. Cappellari. Timothy R. Ruhnke, Advisor. June 2009.
 

DNA Methylation in alteration of US Watermelon Heirloom Genetic Diversity and Regulation of Growth and Development in Arabidopsis Ecotypes. Renee Gist. Umesh K. Reddy, Advisor. July 2009.
 

Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression in Mechanically Stretched Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells. Phillip R. Jones. Robert T. Harris, Advisor. April 2009.
 

Resveratrol Alters Stretch Induced Changes in Morphology and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Signalling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells. Shaik R. Sharif. Robert T. Harris, Advisor. December 2006.
 

DNA Sequencing Variation in Geographic Diverse Samples ofParaorygmatobothrium(Tetraphyllidea: Phyllobothriidae) Collected from the Blacktip Shark,Carcharhinu Limbatus. Robin Le Turner. Tim R. Ruhnke, Advisor. December 2006.
 

A First Linkage Map of Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.) using AFLP and SSR Markers. Jooha Jeong. Umesh Reddy, Advisor. April 2007.
 

Effects of Progesterone and 17-beta-Estradiol on Proliferation and the Expression of DLC1, CAV1, and JUN in Meningioma Cells in Culture. Velvet L. Worstell. Gerald R. Hankins, Advisor. December 2008.
 

Co-Localization of Fruit Yield Related Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) to Understand Domestication Footprints in Cultivated Capsicum Complexes. Srinivasa Rao Asturi. Umesh K. Reddy, Adivsor. November 2007.
 

Dynamics of Genetic Diversity in Cotton as Revealed by the Methylation Profiles. Venkatagopinath Vaija. Umesh K. Reddy, Advisor. July 2008.
 

The Fate of 17-beta-Estradiol in a Thermophilic Anaerobic Digester System. Steven Wade Monday. J. Mark Chatfield, Advisor. November 2005.
 

Biomining of P, K, Mg and the Metals Al and Cu from Thermophilic Anaerobically Digested Poultry Litter UsingAgrocybe aegeritaandPleurotus ostreatus. Jeremy Michael Sisson. J. Mark Chattfield, Advisor. April 2008.
 

Differential Actin Isoform Involvement in Cytoskeletal Remodeling in Smooth Muscle Cells. Stacie Lynne Franson. Robert T. Harris, Advisor. December 2007.
 

Transient Phosphorylation Events Mediate Contractile Tension Maintenance During Inhibition of Ca2+-Dependent and Ca2+-Independent Contractile Pathways in Rat Aorta. Brenda M. Hill. April 2007.
 

Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci in Tetraploid Watermelon. Mohammad A. Rahman. Umesh K. Reddy, Advisor. December 2008.
 

Evaluation of HEK 293 Cells as a Human in vitro Model for NSAIDs Nephrotoxicity. Sophia N. Brown. Gerald R. Hankins, Advisor. December 2010.
 

Resveratrol Attenuates Fluprostenol Indiced Hypertrophy of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells. Rahul Nagmal. Robert Harris, Advisor. May 2011.
 

Nuclear Localization Mediated Function of CHMP1A in the Regulation of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Signaling. Sumanth Manohar. Dr. Maiyon Park, Advisor. Dr. Gerald R Hankins, Thesis Committee Chair. May 2011.

Clubs

Clubs and Organizations of the Department of Biology

Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Honor Society

WVSU is home to the Beta chapter of Beta Kappa Chi (BKX). This national scientific honorary encourages advancement of scientific education through original investigation, and promotes scholarship in the pure and applied sciences. To be eligible for membership, undergraduate students must have completed at least seventeen (17) semester hours in one of the five subjects recognized by BKX (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics or Psychology), with at least a 3.0 average, and have completed at least sixty-four (64) semester hours with an overall 3.0 average. Graduate students are eligible if they have completed at least fifteen (15) semester hours in one of the sciences recognized by the Society with a GPA of 4.0 in at least 1/3 of the hours and at least a 3.0 in the remaining 2/3 semester hours. 
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Tim Ruhnke, Professor of Biology, 101 Hamblin Hall.

Phone (304) 766-3210. Email: ruhnketr@wvstateu.edu

 

Delta Nu Alpha

“The DNA Club” is a student-run and thoroughly inclusive organization, thriving on the participation of all sectors of the WVSU community: undergraduate and graduate students of all majors, staff, faculty, alumni, friends and family members. DNA blends the educational with the social and recreational. Typical activities include camping, hik- ing, challenge bowling and softball matches, and purely social get-togethers. In recent years, fundraising events have included sales of home-made chili, DNA Club tee shirts, and greenhouse plants. One-third of all funds raised is set aside for philanthropic donations (e.g., “Toys for Tots”). DNA continues to cooperate with and support the Biology Department through such activities as an ongoing recycling effort and a “Taste of Hamblin” evening in support of the A.P. Hamblin Scholarship. The DNA Club continues to welcome new members, new ideas, and new plans for service to our department, university, and community.

 

WVSU Honors Program

The Honors Program at WVSU offers enriched academic opportunities for students with high academic achievements. This Program shall identify, recruit, and offer students’ academic challenges that enhance their skills and creativity. The Program will enable students to continue their pursuit of excellence. Applications are available on the WVSU website. For more information, contact Dr. Genia Sklute, 215 Hamblin Hall. Phone: (304) 766-3292. Email: gsklute@wvstateu.edu

 

Graduate Student Association of Biotechnology (GSA of Biotechnology)

The Graduate Student Association of Biotechnology at WVSU acts to unify the research efforts of the graduate student body on a local, national, and international level meanwhile, promoting the concept of scholarly professionalism. Members of this organization strive to promote program awareness through the mentoring of young students, social activities, and research presentations. The goal of GSA is to build an active and effective relationship with faculty to promote advanced learning and resolute research opportunities. 
For more information, contact Dr. Richard Ford (304) 766-5742, fordri@wvstateu.edu, Hamblin Hall 101D

Scholarships
Hamblin Scholarship
 
The Hamblin Scholarship was established as a memorial to Adolph P. Hamblin, Professor of Biology.  The recipient must be majoring in the natural sciences, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, demonstrate financial need, and be recommended by the Biology Department.  Award based on available funds.  Selection of an awardee is done according to the "guidelines for student awards within the WVSU Biology Department".  Selection of the award is advertised. 
 
At its meeting of August 18, 2010, Faculty agreed to award to all eligible students the same amount; "up to $1,000".  This will defray costs of fees, books, etc. that graduate students must pay out of pocket (i.e. not covered by the tuition waiver).  It is expected that all eligible students will apply, and that an equal award will be made to all.  Unused award money will be plowed back into the principal.  Awarded each semester.
 
 
College of NSM:  WVSU Faculty Endowed Scholarship
 
The WVSU Faculty Endowed Scholarship is awardable each academic year.  Students must apply, but each candidate must also be nominated by a Faculty member.  The candidate must have earned at least 30 credit hours by January 1 of the year in which the award is to be made.  The candidate must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher.  The candidate must be registered as a full-time student (12 credit hours or more) and must maintain full-time status during the academic year in which the award is given.  Financial need may be a consideration.  The award is renewable.  The preference is that, over a three-year period, at least one recipient in each college will be a qualified minority student.  Nominations and applications are due May 1.  Immediately thereafter, the College chooses its nominee(s) and the Dean notifies the Chair of the Faculty Scholarship Committee.  Awardees are notified in the summer, and the award is presented at the first general Faculty meeting of the academic year.
 
Additional student fellowship Programs and Opportunities are available through:
NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium
Facilities
Equipment and Facilities
 
Hamblin Hall is home to the Academic Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, and WVSU Computer Services.  Renovations to the original 45,000 sq. ft.* building were completed in 1990, when the building was nearly doubled in size to the current total area of 75,000 sq. ft.  In addition to the labs and classrooms described below, there are additional rooms dedicated to equipment and chemical storage.
 
The Department of Biology faculty, staff and students also have access to the AERS Research Facility located on the west end of campus. This facility comprises the following:
  • Pilot Plant Digester
  • 25 Raised Bed Field Row, each 30 m. X 1 m.
  • Digester Control Room
  • Two storage sheds
  • Two greenhouses
  1. AERS #1: 2100 sq. ft. A greenhouse facilty with 540 square feet o fbench space and supplemental lighting controlled by a QCom environmental control system.
  2. AERS #2: 2880 sq. ft. A greenhouse with 128 dutch buckets and a vertical hydroponic system capable of growing 1,344 plants in 480 sq. ft of floor space , and 240 sq. ft. of bench space.
For fieldwork, WVSU has raised beds with more than 2500 linear feet of space on campus, an access to off-site fields with the WV Dept of Agriculture

Off-Campus Research Laboratory Facilities 
Building 740 at the Dow Technical Center in South Charleston, WV. - 480+ sq ft and includes all equipment to pursue molecular biology research, seed cleaning processes and fruit quality evaluations.
  • Chemical fume hood
  • Autoclave
  • Incubators
  • Ovens
  • 20 cu ft refrigerator
  • 20 cu ft freezer
  • 24 cu ft Revco
  • -80C freezer
  • Photodocumentation system
  • Thermal cyclers
  • Agarose & acrylamide electrophoresis equipment
  • HP UV/VIS spectrophotometer
  • Centrifuges
  • Water baths
  • Single and multi channel electronic pipettes
  • Microwave
  • Rocking platform shaker
  • Stirring/hot plates
  • Top-loading balance
  • Analytical balance
  • Thermolyne heat blocks
  • Sorvall floor centrifuge
  • Barnstead water system with RO and distillation Type I water purification system
  • Percival environmental chamber with microprocessor controlled light, temperature, and humidity
  • Four networked Windows XP computers with Microsoft Office 2007, SAS Version 9, Sigma Plot, EndNote, XI, and connections to printers, digital cameras, video cameras, and scanners. 
 
Hamblin Hall Classrooms:
  • H107:                       Seating capacity 50
  • H212:                       Seating capacity 45
  • H213:                       Seating capacity 15
  • Hamblin Auditorium:  Seating capacity 144
 
Teaching Laboratories:

Microbiology/Molecular Biology/Cell Biology/Genetics
            H134, 1080 sq. ft. 24 student stations with cup sinks

Human Sciences
            H140, 1080 sq. ft.  30 student stations with on-bench ventilation

Botanical Sciences
            H203, 855 sq. ft. 24 student stations

General Education Biological Sciences
            H205, 1296 sq. ft. 36 student stations
            H209, 1296 sq. ft. 40 student stations

Zoological Sciences
            H218, 955 sq. ft. 24 student stations

Physical Chemistry/Environmental Chemistry/Biochemistry
            H222, 1139 sq. ft. 24 student stations with 1 fume hood; acid/base storage

Organic Chemistry
            H302, 912 sq. ft. 24 student stations with fume hoods

General Chemistry/General Education Chemical Sciences
            H320, 1092 sq. ft. 24 student stations with on-bench ventilation, acid storage
            H324, 1092 sq. ft. 24 student stations with on-bench ventilation
            H312, 365 sq. ft. 12 student computer workstations for weather studies

General Physics/General Education Physical Sciences
            H307, 1056 sq. ft. 36 student stations
            H311, 750 sq. ft. 24 student stations
            H316, 962 sq. ft. 16 student stations
 
Research labs and Special facilities (Hamblin Hall)
 
  • Pilot Plant Thermophilic Anaerobic Bioreactor 10,000 gal. with control software
  • Greenhouses -    H201C, 576 sq. ft. and H201B, 200 sq. ft. head house
  • Microbiology/Molecular lab - H102, 923 sq. ft. with fume hood
  • Darkroom - H132, 100 sq. ft.
  • Electrophoresis lab - H136, 256 sq. ft. with class II safety hood
  • Instruments lab - H144, 282 sq. ft.
  • Biology prep labs - H142, 594 sq. ft. and H207, 208 sq. ft. with instrument ventilation
  • Fermentation lab - H145, 234 sq. ft. A divided lab for analysis and control of three, 50 L. model thermophilic, anaerobic bioreactors with independent ventilation and anaerobic chamber.
  • Aquaculture labs - G26, 600 sq. ft.  A facility with thirty-six 110 L. aquaria plumbed for continuous flow; with 3 holding tanks for fish and 900 gal. of       dechlorinated water and H309, 650 sq. ft. with explosion-proof and standard fume hoods
  • Microscopy and Image Analysis labs - H126, 306 sq. ft. and H201A, 308 sq. ft.
  • Chemistry prep labs - H326, 216 sq. ft. with fume hood, flammable storage, acid storage; H328, 196 sq.ft with fume hood; and H330, 312 sq. ft., dispensing
  • Organic Synthesis Research labs - H230, 180 sq. ft. with fume hood, acid storage; H310, 598 sq. ft. with 3 fume hoods, acid storage, flammable storage; and H321, 280 sq. ft. with fume hood, acid storage
  • Biomedical/Plant Genomics Suite - H303/305/301, 1400 sq. ft. with fume hood, acid storage
  • Biomedical Research lab - H232, 345 sq. ft. with fume hood
  • Analytical Chemistry Research lab - H202, 650 sq. ft. with 2 fume hoods, acid storage, flammable storage
  • Inorganic Chemistry Research labs - H204, 288 sq. ft. with walk-in and standard fume hoods
  • Biochemistry and Instrumental Analysis Research lab - H224, 896 sq. ft. with two fume hoods; instrument ventilation; flammable storage
  • NMR facility - H 228, 195 sq. ft. with independent temperature control and fume hood
  • Spectroscopy labs - H332, 192 sq. ft.
  • Science Student Computer Center - H106, 288 sq. ft. with 10 student workstations
 
Equipment
  • Hewlett-Packard gas chromatograph with thermal conductivity & flame ionization detectors.
  • Varian 300MHz Gemini 2000 NMR high field spectrometer
  • Analytical Spectral Devices field spectral radiometer
  • Mattson Model 4020 FTIR spectrometer
  • Mattson Model ATI IR microscope
  • Aquatek Model 50 water analyzer with Tekmar 3000 Purge and Trap Concentrator
  • Spectronic 21D UV/VIS spectrophotometer
  • Ocean Optics UV/VIS fiber optics spectrophotometer
  • Perkin-Elmer LS55 luminescence spectrometer
  • $98,000 from NSF MRI program, received fall of 2002 for purchase of ICP spectrometer; model yet to be determined.
  • Waters HPLC with 600E system controller, 712 WISP injection system and Model 990 photodiode array detector.
  • Hewlett-Packard Model 8452A UV/VIS diode array spectrophotometer
  • Perkin Elmer atomic absorption spectrometer with lamps for various metals and HGA 850 graphite furnace
  • HP 5890 gas chromatograph with 5972 mass selective detector
  • Beckman Model 915A total carbon analyzer
  • Tekmar-Dohrman total chlorine analyzer
  • Bioanalytical Systems CV50W electrochemical analyzer
  • Coy Laboratories model A anaerobic glove box chamber
  • Hach Odyssey model DR/2500 spectrophotometer for analysis of COD, volatile acids, total ans reactive phosphates, ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite
  • ThermoOrion ISE meter with probes to detect: ammonia, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and potassium
  • Pharmacia FPLC with UV-MII monitor, fraction collector, dual chart recorder and various columns
  • BioRad Econo low pressure chromatography system with columns, peristaltic pumps, fraction collector, in-line absorbance detector and controller.
  • Cary 1 UV/VIS scanning spectrophotometer with a 6x6 temperature controlled cell block and available enzyme kinetic software.
  • BRL Cell-Porator electroporation system for bacterial, yeast, plant and animal cells.
  • Two Perkin-Elmer Model 2400 and one 9700 PCR thermal cyclers, one Eppendorf Master Cycler
  • Applied Biosystems ABI Prism 7000 Real Time Sequence Detection System for the kinetic detection of PCR products.
  • IEC Minotome Plus Cryostatic Microtome
  • Turner Fluorometer
  • ThermoSavant ISS110 Speed Vac system with 96 well plate rotor
  • Thermo Class II A Biological Safety Cabinet
  • Flexerell FX4000 Strain Unit
  • Refrigeration equipment numerous refrigerator/freezers (some explosion-proof), two chromatography refrigerators and three-80°C freezers.
  • Centrifuges: RC-5B refrigerated centrifuge, Beckman T2-100 ultracentrifuge, Eppendorf 5810R centrifuge with swinging plate/bucket rotor, Eppendorf 5415D centrifuge, microcentrifuges and clinical centrifuges.
  • Electrophoresis equipment: BioRad mini-protean-II units, IBI 3000 volt  sequencing power supply, Labnet Powerstation 300 volt power supply, BioRad 300 volt power supplies, and EC 300 power supplies; IBI, Stratagene, BioRad, Horizon, GeneMate and BRL DNA gel units, Life Technology & IBI submarine gel units. EC 1001 Isothermal controlled unit; BioRad Decode Universal Mutation Detection System.
  • Two Licor 4300 DNA Analyzers/Sequencers: Licor Odyssey Infrared Imaging System for Western blot analysis, EMSA, protein arrays,  in vivo imaging, Coomassie gel documentation, DNA gel documentation and tissue section analysis. 
  • 16- Capillary Applied Biosystems 3130xl Genetic Analyzer for genotyping and sequencing.
  • Beckman CEQ 8800 capillary system for genotyping and sequencing
  • GenePix 4100A  Microarray scanner for microarrays, tissue and cell arrays, and fluorescence studies
  • Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer for quantification and quality control of DNA, RNA, proteins and cells on a single platform.
  • Three ABI 2720 Thermal Cyclers.
  • Nuaire Laminar Airflow Workstation
  • Three Spectrfuge 24D Centrifuges
  • Barnstead shaker/incubator
  • Partec ploidy Analyzer for ploidy and genome size analysis
  • Two Licor 4300 DNA Analyzers/Sequencers.Licor Odyssey Infrared Imaging System for Western blot analysis, EMSA, protein arrays,  in vivo imaging, Coomassie gel documentation, DNA gel documentation and tissue section analysis. 
  • Beckman CEQ 8800 capillary system for genotyping and sequencing
  • GenePix 4100A  Microarray scanner for microarrays, tissue and cell arrays, and fluorescence studies
  • Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer for quantification and quality control of DNA, RNA, proteins and cells on a single platform.
  •  Alpha Innotech Fluor Chem 8900 image analysis system for the quantitative anaylsis of DNA, RNA and protein
  • Stratagene hybridization equipment including UV-Stratalinker 1800, Rotissere hybridization oven and pressure blotter
  • Hach and Precision programmable BOD incubators, CO2 incubators
  • Lab-line Model 3530-6 refrigerated environmental shakers
  • Packard 1900 liquid scintillation counter, Bioscan QC-2000 counter for 32P and 125I, and two Victoreen survey meters.
  • Barnstead E Pure water purification system Model D4641 with Fistreem Calypso glass still
  • Barnstead double-stage glass distillation water purification system
  • Kjeldahl, crude protein analysis system, Soxtlet fat extraction system, crude fiber analysis apparatus
  • Leco TruSpec N Elemental Determinator
  • AC 350  Bomb Calorimeter
  • New Brunswick Scientific Innova 40 Incubator Shaker
  • Fisher Scientific Isotherm Oven
  • BioTEK Synergy HT absorbance/fluorescence/luminescence Microplate Reader
  • Intech Fiber optic Oxygen Monitor
  • AB-2720 Thermal Cycler (part# 4359659)
  • GeneAmp PCR System Model 9700 (part# N8050200)
  • Gateway  E-6500 Computer and Monitor
  • Eppendorf Desk-top Centrifuge Model 5417C
  • VWR Water Heater Model  1104 X 2 (Cat# 1327-060)
  • Polyscience Water Heater Model 210
  • CEL-GRO tissue culture rotator – Lab Line (Cat# 235670)
  • Freezer – Frigidaire Commercial
  • New Brunswick Sci. Ultra Low Temp Freezer Model U-725 (Cat# U-944-0002)
  • Fisher Sci. Isotemp Lab Refrigerator
  • LABCONCO Purifier Clean Bench (Cat# 361000)
  • Precision Science Low Temp Incubator Model 815
  • VWR General Purpose Freezer (-20oC) (Cat# 3761)
  • Biorad PowerPac Model Basic 300V/400mA/75w
  • Biorad Power Pac Model 300
  • Precision Microprocessor Controlled 280 Series Water Bath
  • Fast-Prep FP 120 Bio101 – Thermal Electrical Company Model FP120A-115
  • Beckman TL-100 Ultracentrifuge (Cat# 346457)
  • Labline Refrigerated Environmental Floor Incubator/Shaker (Model 3530)
  • Coy Anaerobic Chamber  Model AATC 200 SERIES
  • Biorad Mutation Detection (DGGE/TGGE) Model D-Code
  • Precision Circulation Water Bath Model 260 (Cat# 51221035)
General lab equipment
  • pH meters with several selective ion probes
  • dissolved oxygen meters
  • analytical balances
  • top-loading balances
  • Thermolyne heat blocks
  • Speed Vacs with Savant refrigerated traps
  • BioRad slab gel dryer
  • Fotodyne UV-light table
  • Polaroid and Fotodyne cameras
  • rotary evaporators
  • distillation apparatus
  • stirring hot/plates
  • water baths
  • Spectronic GENESYS 2
  • Spectronic 20 and Spectronic 20D student spectrophotometers
  • Simplex carbon filte
  • A-200 Floor Model Mixer
  • autoclaves
  • laminar flow hoods
  • incubators/incubator shakers
  • vacuum and box furnaces
  • programmable growth chambers
  • micropipettors
  • waterbaths
  • dishwasher
  • vortexers
  • drying ovens
  • colorimeter
  • disc mill
  • grinding mill
  • CO2 incubator
  • Sony digital cameras
  • ultrasonicators
  • multiple channel adjustable dispensers
  • Networked pentium computers with access to HP LaserJet 5 printers, color printer, digital, still and video cameras and a flatbed scanner.
Field Studies Equipment

Plant, animal and soil sampling equipment:
  • nets
  • burlese funnels
  • pit fall
  • traps
  • aspirators and kill jars
  • plant presses
  • pruners
  • dichotomous keys
Environmental equipment:
  • densiometers
  • clinometers
  • hygrometers
  • light
  • meters
  • altimeters
  • field tapes
Mapping equipment:
  • radiometric distance measurers
  • GPS
  • Complete GIS workstation with AutoCAD and ARCVIEW
  • Lab equipment such as vacuum chamber, vacuum filtration, and light bench.
Microscopes for teaching and research:
  • Leica MZ6 stereo microscope with digital Hitachi camera
  • Broderson fiber optic light source
  • Dell Dimension XPS B1000 workstation with paper port 610 scanner
  • Leica DMLS compound microscope with Pixera digital camera, computer workstation, and Olympus Camedia digital color printer.
  • Wild Heerbrugor stereo dissection microscope
  • Zeiss Axioskop compound microscope 2plus with camera mount
  • Nikon confocal deconvolution microscope and workstation with dedicated computer for 3-D image analysis
  • AO stereo dissecting microscope
  • Accu-scope 3030P inverted phase contrast microscope
  • 24 Leica DM500 binocular student microscopes
  • 26 Nikon binocular student microscopes
  • 30 Unico binocular student microscopes
  • 36 Swift binocular student microscopes
  • 20 Swift stereo dissection student microscopes
  • 24 National stereo dissection student microscopes
Image analysis equipment:
  • Two scopes with Hitachi video and digital interface connection to DELL computer with sigmascan image analysis software
  • Olympus digital camera
Faculty Emeritus
Dr. Tom Hutto - Professor Emeritus
SURE (Summer Undergraduate Research Experience) Program

2011 Summer Undergraduate Research Experience

Amanda Carte*, Sean Collins and Michael McClain. The Social Wasps of Kanawha County
 

Kevin Carte* and Robert Harris. Effect of Mechanical Stretch on Expression of Smooth Muscle Titin
 

Lori Dingess*, Jeremy Sisson and Barbara E. Liedl. Screening Greenhouse Tomato Breeding Lines for Late Blight Markers
 

Alnairouz Katrib* and Gerald Hankins. Cyclin Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Meningioma
 

Cameron Lewis* and Timothy Ruhnke.  Continued Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing of Paraorygmatobothrium Species
 

Grace Nyiiro* and Gerald Hankins.  Inhibition of Tumor Cell Growth and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth and Migration by Hibiscus sabdariffa Anthocyanins
 

Julie Blaylock**, Jonathan Loyd**, Emily Sauvageot, Ryan Starkey and Ami Smith.  Bacterial Diversity in an Anaerobic Digester and its Associated Feed Stock
 

Krista Abdalla*, Thomas Guetzloff and Micheal Fultz.  Substituent Effects of Anilines in the Microwave- Induced Cyclization with Maleic Anhydride
 

Robert Morris* and Micheal Fultz.  I. Efforts to Couple Dihydroresveratro II. Examination of the Substituent Effects on Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis
 

Jessica Robinson* and Genia Sklute.  Reactivity and Diastereoselectivity of Acyl Zirconocene towards Chiral Sulfinimes
 

William Rollyson*, Micheal Fultz and Gerald Hankins.  Progress Toward the Synthesis of Spathoside. Completion of the C1-C10 Chain
 

Amy Xu* and Ernest Sekabunga.  Extraction of Silver (I) Ions from Aqueous Solution
 

Christopher Akers*** and Andrew Schedl.  Is There a Link Between Meteorite Impacts and Landslides in Valles Marineris?  In most cases no!
 

Megan Emmet* and Andrew Schedl.  Preliminary Calcite Twin Analysis of Versailles, KY and Dycus, TN Structures:  Part 2
 

Nathan Rorhrbaugh* and Andrew Schedl.  

Calcite Twin Strain Analysis: An Effective Alternative for Identifying Meteorite Impacts?
 

Christopher Wagner* and Andrew Schedl.  Determining Meteorite Impacts via Calcite-Twin Analysis at Jeptha Knob, KY: Part 2
 

HSTA INBRE Poster Presentations:

Response of Genes that are Dys-regulated in Meningiomas to Female Steroid Hormones and Epigenetic Agents in Meningioma Cells In Vitro.  Johnathan Baldwin1, Alnairouz Katrib2, Gerald R. Hankins2.  1 Scott High School, Boone County, WV, 2Department of Biology, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV.
    

Effect of Slippery Elm Bark (Ulmus rubra) Extract on Proliferation and Migration of Smooth Muscle and Tumor Cells. Timothy Clifton1, Tiffani Smith2, Anojinie Karunathilake3, Grace Nyiiro3, Gerald Hankins3, Robert Harris3. 1Herbert Hoover High School, Clendenin, WV; 2Huntington High School, Huntington, WV; 3Department of Biology, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV.
 

 Effects of Trans-resveratrol and Extracts of Resveratrol Supplements on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells. Tiffani Smith1, Timothy Clifton2, Anojinie Karunathilake3, Robert Harris3. 1Huntington High School, Huntington, WV; 2Herbert Hoover High School, Clendenin, WV;  3Department of Biology, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV.
 

2010 Summer Undergraduate Research Experience

Thomas R. Cabell Auditorium, July 30, 2010

 

Screening of Field and Heirloom Varieties for Pathogen Resistance Using CAPS Markers. Douglas Bright, Jeremy Sisson, Barbara E. Liedl

Understanding Plant Reproduction Barriers to Improve Transfer of Desired Traits: Separating Self Incompatibility from Self Compatibility in Cultivated Tomato, Solanum lycopersicum and a Wild Species, S. pennellii. Hannah M. Cavender, Jeremy M. Sisson and Barbara E. Liedl

Identification of Heterologous Microsatellite Markers between Watermelon and Cucumber. Shawn Simms and Umesh Reddy

Effects of Diets on the Carbonyl content of Oxidatively Modified Mitochondrial Proteins in Rainbow Trout. Tarko Seble, Martha Ashame, Charles Pomeroy and Jonathan Eya

Major Chemicals Found in the Kanawha and Caol Rivers and Their Potential Effects on Aquatic and Terrestial Organisms. Michael McClain and Sean Collins

Growth and Development of Rana spcies in Water from the Kanawha and Coal Rivers. Amanda Carte and Sean Collins

Additional DNA Sequencing of Anthocephalum and other Rhinebothriid Species from Stingrays. L. Elaine Hensley and Tim Ruhnke

Progress Towards the Synthesis of Dihydroresveratrol Dimers. Robert Morris and Michael Fultz

Metal Ion Removal from Aqueous Solution. Nicolas Nogoda and Ernest Sekabunga

The Substituent Effects of Aniline in the Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of N-Phenylsuccinimides and N-Phenylmaliemides. Kevin Gammand Tom Guetzloff

Statistical and Cluster Analysis of Schwannoma Microarray Data. Benjamin Wilson and Gerald Hankins

Preliminary Calcite Twin Analysis of Versailles, KY and Dycus, TN Structures. Kevin Carte and Andrew Schedl

Determining Meterorite Impacts via Calcite-Twin Analysis at Jeptha Knob, KY. Lindsey Mundy and Andrew Schedl

Free Radical Scavenging and Apoptosis Induction by Hibiscus Extracts. William Rollyson, Christopher Racine, Sophia Brown and Gerald Hankins
 

WVSU Annual Research Symposium

Seventeenth Annual Research Symposium

Sponsored by:
NASA WV Space Grant Consortium
West Virginia IDEA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE)
West Virginia State University Gus R. Douglass Land Grant Institute
West Virginia State University College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

Keynote Speaker:
John C. Warner 
President and Chief Technology Officer , Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry
President, The Beyond Benign Foundation
Green Chemistry: The Missing Element of Science Education
 

Student Presentations


Jeremy Arthur, Elaine Hensley, and Tim R. Ruhnke - Molecular and Morphological Systematics of the Tapeworm Genus Anthocephalum

Shawn Simms, Gopinath Vajja, Padma Nimmakayala, and Umesh K. Reddy - Development of Synthetic Map of Pumpkin and Watermelon

Frank Lutz  and Umesh K. Reddy - Synthetic Analysis of Cucurbit Cultivar Complex Using Microsatellite Markers

Dustin L. Moore and Gerald R. Hankins - Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factors and Their Receptors in Meningioma Cells

William D. Rollyson and Gerald R. Hankins - In Vitro SCreening of Compounds from Hibiscus sabdariffa for Anti-Tumor Activity

Robert J. Morris  and Micheal Fultz - Progress Towards the Synthesis of Dihydroresveratrol Dimers

Sixteenth Annual Research Symposium

Sponsored by:

  • WV NASA Space Grant Consortium

  • West Virginia IDEA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE)

  • West Virginia State University Gus R. Douglass Land Grant Institute


Keynote Speaker:  Noelle Umback - Supervisor, Department of Forensic Biology OCME CODIS, New York, NY
 

Faculty Presentations:
 

Dr. Gerald Hankins - Cancer Research at West Virginia State University

Dr. Tim Ruhnke - Phyllobothriidae: A Monograph

Dr. Micheal W. Fultz - Total Synthesis: The Needs of Society Met in Chemistry

Dr. Andrew Schedl - Jeptha knob is an Impact Structure
 

Student Presentations:
 

Hannah M. Cavender, Jeremy M. Sisson and Barbara E. Liedl  - Evaluating Greenhouse Tomato Breeding Lines for Improved Souble Solids, Lycopene and Beta Carotene.

Sarah Cowen, Pete Hunt, Tim Ruhnke - Taxonomy and Systematic of the Stingray Cestode Genus Anthocephalum

Rita Goodall and Andrew D. Schedl - The Role of Meteorite Impacts in Flooding on Mars

Frank Lutz and Umesh K. Reddy - Synthetic Analysis of Cucurbit Cultivar Complex Through the Development and Use of Microsatellite Markers

Dustin L. Moore, Christopher R. Racine and Gerald R. Hankins - Differences in Anti-Tumor Properties of Hibiscus sabdariffa Accessions

Nicolas Nogoda and Ernest Sekabunga - Investigation of the Coordination Modes of Two Classes of Bidentate Phosphine Ligands.

Grace N. Nyiiro, Molly E. Siedler, CHristopher R. Racine, Velvet L. Worstell, and Gerald R. Hankins - Exogenous Expression of the DCL1 Tumor Suppressor Gene Effects Expression of Other Genes that are Dysregulated in Meningiomas

Rachel Workman and Tim Ruhnke - Taxonomy and Systematics of the Shark Cestode Paraorygmatobothrium.

Benjamin L. Wilson and Naveed Zaman - The Existence of Cudes Terminating in Arbitrary Strings of Digits.

Fourteenth Annual Research Symposium

Hamblin Hall Science Building, April 25, 2008

Gene Expression Related to Fruit Quality Traits of  Watermelon at Various Ploidy Levels. Mohammad A. Rahman, Sathish K. Ponnaiah, Gopinath Vaija, Yan Tomason, Umesh K. Reddy, and  Padma Nimmakayala

 

Cultivation of Agrocybe aegerita on Solid Waste from Thermophillic Anaerobic Digesetin of Poultry Litter. Omon S. Isikuemhen, Jeremy M. Sisson, Barbara E. Liedl and J. Mark Chatfield
 

Molecular Analysis of Biofilm Communities in a Thermophilic Anaerobic Digester. Ami Smith, Hillary Lappin-Scott, Sara Burton, David H. Huber
 

Phylogenetic Investigations of Paraorygmatobothrium and Alllied Genera. Kayde Cappellari and Tim Ruhnke
 

Response of Smooth Muscle Cells to Cyclic Versus Static Stretch. Niki Davis, Stacie Franson and Robert Harris
 

Jeptha Knob and the Search for Impacts and Ejecta in the Midwest. Jason Goode and Andrew Schedl
 

Observing Cytokinesis in a Mechanical Environment. Maria Haffar, Stacie Franson and Robert Harris
 

Gene Expression Profiling in Mechanically Stressed Smooth Muscle Cells. Phillip R. Jones, Sathish K. Ponniah, Umesh K. Reddy, and Robert T. Harris
 

Association Mapping for Locating Quantitative Traits: A Case Study Using Petal Length in Arabidopsis. Zura Kerdieh, Mohammad A. Rahman, Padma Nimmakayala, Katherine L. Harper and Umesh K. Reddy
 

Characterization of Succinimide. Dan Palmer, Katie Poole, Josh Smith, Jennifer Shell, Tom Guetzloff and Thomas Shell
 

Synthesis Strategy for Succinimide. Katie Poole, Dan Palmer, Josh Smith, Jennifer Shell, Tom Guetzloff and Thomas Shell
 

PCR and Sequencing of the Large Ribosomal Subunit for Selected Cestodes of Sharks. Johanna Ray and Tim Ruhnke
 

New Microsatellites Identified for the Wasp Vespa Crabro. Amy Vincent and Sean A. Collins


Thirteenth Annual Research Symposium

Hamblin Hall Science Building, April 20, 2007

Methanogen Diversity in an Anaerobic Biofilm Digester. Matthew Medley, Ami Smith and David H. Huber
 

Additional Investigations on Species of the Cestode Genus Thysanocephalum. Leah Wilson and Tim Ruhnke
 

Determining the Expression of DLC1 in Human Melanoma Cells. Renee A. West, Beverly C. Delidow and Gerald R. Hankins
 

Silencing of Actin Genes in Smooth Muscle Cells. David Van Bibber, Stacie Franson, Sean Thatcher, Dawn Brown and Robert T. Harris
 

Identification of Genes for Pepper Fruit Related Traits from Two Capsicum Cultivated Complexes. Srinivasa Rao Asturi, Umesh K. Reddy and Padmavathi Nimmakayla
 

Synthesis of N-(3-5-Dichlorophenyl)-2-Hydroxysuccinimide-o-Sulfates (NSC) and Other Compounds. Collette Witkowski, Gary Rankin and Thomas F. Guetzolf
 

Effect of Steroid Hormones on SF1 Expression in Meningiomas. Anjam A. Begam, Virginia E. Hunter and Gerald R. Hankins
 

Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on DLC1 and CAV1 Expression in Meningioma Cells. Virginia E. Hunter, A. Begram and Gerald R. Hankins
 

Functional Genomics of Mechanical Stress in Smooth Muscle. Phillip Jones, Padmavathi Nimmakayala, Umesh K. Reddy, Stacie Franson and Robert T.  Harris
 

Microsatellite Analysis for Understanding Species Relations Among Cultivated Complexes of Capsicum SPP. Suzanne Smith, Padmavathi Nimmakayla and Umesh K. Reddy
 

Faculty & Staff

Ms. Audrana
Ms. Audrana Austin
Academic Program Associate
Phone: (304) 766-5778
aaustin1@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Sean
Dr. Sean Collins
Assistant Professor, Biology
scollin5@wvstateu.edu
Ms. Glenna
Ms. Glenna Curry
Administrative Secretary, Sr.
Phone: (304) 766-3102
gcurry4@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Richard
Dr. Richard Ford
Associate Professor of Biology
Phone: (304) 766-5742
fordri@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Katherine
Dr. Katherine Harper
Professor and Chair, Department of Biology
Phone: (304) 766-3142
harperkl@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Barbara
Dr. Barbara Liedl
Associate Professor Research, Department of Biology
Phone: (304) 932-0843
liedlbe@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Padma
Dr. Padma Nimmakayala
Assistant Professor of Research, Department of Biology
Phone: (304) 766-3258
padma@wvstateu.edu
Umesh K.
Umesh K. Reddy, Ph.D.
Professor of Genetics and Genomics Department of Biology
Phone: (304) 766-3066
ureddy@wvstateu.edu
Dr.
Dr. Sanjaya
Director, WVSU Energy and Environmental Science Institute, Assistant Professor
Phone: (304) 414-4062
sanjaya@wvstateu.edu
Scroll to Top