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Mathematics & Computer Science

The Mathematics program endeavors to give students a sound background for a basic understanding of science; to give prospective teachers a professional attitude, a strong subject matter foundation and adequate skills and techniques in the application and the teaching of the material; and, to show students that mathematics is a living and vital discipline by seeing it applied in the classroom and in the various fields of industry.


The Department also offers the Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science. This program will teach students about object-oriented and procedural programming techniques, data structures and database management, operating systems and distributed computing in order to provide them with a fundamental understanding of those concepts of computer science which will enable them to adapt to and function in any current computing environment.

image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowMessage from Chair
Why Study Mathematics? 

Mathematics is a rich field with a storied history of brilliant thinkers such as Archimedes, Euclid, Fermat, Newton, Gauss, Emmy Noether and West Virginia native John Nash.  A wide variety of fields, including biology, chemistry, physics, statistics, computer science, engineering, actuarial science and economics are fundamentally dependent on mathematics.  Indeed, it is impossible to find a field of study today in which mathematics has no application.  In Galileo’s words, “Mathematics is the language in which God has written the universe.”

Why Study Computer Science? 

Computer Science is the systematic study of using computers to solve problems.  It involves hardware design, analysis of algorithms and software development.  It is a dynamic field that develops the principles that will guide future technological advances in many industries and areas of life.  Computer Science has applications in virtually every major field, including banking, business, engineering, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, communications and entertainment, to name just a few.
image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowCurriculum & Degrees
image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowComputer Science Courses
CS 100. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS (3 credit hours)
Computer History, application and ethics, operating systems, word processing, spread sheets, databases and integrating applications, data communications and the internet computer security and privacy. Prerequisite: ACT Math score 19 or above or equivalent.

CS 101. PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTAL (3 credit hours)
The fundamental concepts of procedural programming using C, historical and social context of computing, and an overview of computer science as a discipline. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Math 120.

CS 102. THE OBJECT-ORIENTED PARADIGM (3 credit hours)
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of the object-oriented paradigm and use of a programming language with OO specific features. Prerequisite: "C" or better in CS 101.

CS 202. FORTRAN PROGRAMMING (3 credit hours)
Structured FORTRAN with documentation, input-output, loops, logic statements.  Prerequisites: MATH 120 and CS 101.

CS 204. INTRODUCTION TO COBOL PROGRAMMING (3 credit hours)
Provides the basic elements of the computer language necessary to run programs with an emphasis on business applications. Prerequisites: CS 101.

CS 210. FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATING SYSTEMS (3 credit hours)
An introduction to the organization of computer operating systems and the range of computer operations available through effi cient use of operating systems. Prerequisite:  CS 102.

CS 214.  INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL BASIC (3 credit hours)
This course introduces students to the standard visual basic forms, controls and event procedures.  Sequential and random access file handling, database access and general language structure will be explored.  Prerequisite: CS 101.

CS 230. DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3 credit hours)
This course presents the history of data base management systems, the logical and physical structures of several current models, and deals in a practical, experiential way with the design of data bases and the management systems that control them. Prerequisites: CS 102.

CS 236. INTRODUCTION TO  PASCAL (3 credit hours)
The basic concepts and skills, including general problem-solving techniques, files and text processing, and abstract data structures. Prerequisites: CS 101. 

CS 240.  DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING (3 credit hours)
An introduction to the theories, terminology, equipment, and distribution media associated with data communications and networking.  Prerequisite: CS 102.

CS 250. DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS (3 credit hours)
An introduction to the implementation and use of abstract data types including dynamic arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, and heaps as well as algorithms that operate on these structures with a preliminary study of algorithmic complexity. Prerequisite: CS 102 and MATH 205

CS 266. INTRODUCTION TO JAVA (3 credit hours)
This course introduces students to the JAVA programming language.  This object-oriented language is gaining popularity for developing secure, platform independent applications and often the language of choice for internet applications. Prerequisite: CS 102.

CS 299. SPECIAL TOPICS (1–4 credit hours)
A sophomore-level course designed for a topic of special current interest. Prerequisite: As stated by the offering.

CS 309. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (3 credit hours)
Application of the tools, methods, and disciplines of computer science to solving real-world problems. Topics include: the software process, software life-cycle models, software teams, quality assurance, project duration and cost estimation. Prerequisite: CS 250. 

CS 310. COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING (3 credit hours)
An introduction to the design and organization of computer systems.  Introduction to tradeoff evaluation based on Amdahl's Law and discussion of fundamental building blocks of computer systems including the arithmetic logic unit (ALU), floating point unit (FPU), memory hierarchy, and input-output (I/O) system. Study includes the instruction set architecture (ISA), a comparison of RISC and CISC architectures. Prerequisites: CS 102 and MATH 205.

CS 311. OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (3 credit hours)
Object-oriented programming using languages such as C++, Java, Smalltalk, Delphi. Prerequisite: CS 250.

CS 335. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3 credit hours)
Life cycle of business information study, design, development, and operating phases; feasibility; project control. Prerequisites: CS 250.

CS 336. SCRIPTING LANGUAGES (3 credit hours)
Shell scripts and batch files, programming using interpreted languages such as PERL, Python, PHP, JavaScript or VBScript for automation of system administration tasks and web programming. Prerequisite: CS 102.

CS 365. GUI PROGRAMMING (3 credit hours)
Graphical user interface design and implementation using visual programming tools and libraries. Prerequisite: CS 250. 

CS 399. Special Topics (1–3 credit hours)
A sophomore-level course designed for a topic of special current interest. Prerequisite: As stated by the offering.

CS 405. Algorithms (3 credit hours)
Design and analysis of algorithms and data structures, asymptotic analysis, recurrence relations, probabilistic analysis, divide and conquer, searching, sorting, and graph processing algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 250.

CS 408. SENIOR COMPUTER SCIENCE SEMINAR (2 credit hours)
Integrates the work completed in the various courses. Reading and research oriented. (To be taken in one of the last two semesters prior to graduation.)

CS 410. SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION (3 credit hours)
Maintenance of a multi-user computer system, managing services, managing users, managing data, file systems, networking, security. Prerequisites: CS 240 and CS 336.

CS 415. THEORY OF COMPUTING (3 credit hours)
Formal grammars and languages, Chomsky Normal Form, Greibach Normal Form, finite automata, pushdown automata, turning machines, computability. Prerequisites: CS 250 and CS 311.

CS 425. COMPILER DESIGN (3 credit hours)
Introduces the theory and practice of programming language translation. Topics include compiler design, lexical analysis, parsing, symbol tables, declaration and storage management, code generation, and optimization techniques.  Prerequisites: CS 250 and CS310.

CS 445. EMBEDDED SYSTEMS (3 credit hours)
An introduction to embedded system design and implementation, including specifications and modeling of embedded systems, hardware/software co-design, development methodologies, and system verification and implementation with CAD tools. Prerequisites: CS310 or equivalent.
 
image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowMathematics Courses
MATH 020. FUNDAMENTALS OF ALGEBRA (3 credit hours)
Real Numbers and their operations, algebraic expressions, integer components, polynomial arithmetic and factorization, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, lines, systems of linear equations, applications. Prerequisite: ACT Math 15-18 or equivalent.

MATH 021. ESSENTIALS OF ALGEBRA (1 credit hour)
Real numbers, linear equations, systems of linear equations in two variables, quadratic equations, square roots, evaluating polynomials, radical and exponential expressions. Prerequisite(s): MATH 020, or ACT Math 17+ or equivalent.

MATH 102. PLANE TRIGONOMETRY (3 credit hours)
Trigonometry functions and graphs, identities and equations, solving triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, De Moivre 's Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 120 or ACT Math score of 23 or above or permission of instructor.

MATH 103. PROBLEM SOLVING AND NUMBER SENSE (3 credit hours)
Estimation, problem solving, sets, whole and rational number operations and properties, the set of integers, elementary number theory.  Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 120.

MATH 104. ALGEBRA, STATISTICS, AND PROBABILITY (3 credit hours)
Rational numbers, percent, probability, statistics, algebraic methods and problem solving, with reference to the NCTM standards.  Prerequisite: MATH 103.

MATH 105. GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT (3 credit hours)
Geometry, measurement, transformations, coordinates, with reference to the NCTM standards.  Prerequisite: MATH 103.

MATH 111. MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS (3 credit hours)
Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 020 or ACT Math score of 19-22, or by placement test when appropriate.

MATH 119. ALGEBRAIC METHODS (3 credit hours)
Quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, systems of linear equations, graphs of functions, exponentials and logarithms. Prerequisite(s): C or better in MATH 020, MATH 021, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 021, or ACT MATH 19+ or equivalent.

MATH 120. COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3 credit hours)
Equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, rational expressions, radical expressions, and applications of the above. Prerequisite: ACT Math Score of 19 or above, or by placement test, or equivalent.

MATH 121. PRECALCULUS (4 credit hours)
Properties and applications of algebraic and transcendental functions, angles, trigonometric ratios and identities, conic sections, polar coordinates, systems of equations, matrices. Prerequisite: "C" or better in MATH 120, or ACT Math score of 23 or above, or by placement test when appropriate.

MATH 205. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (3 credit hours)
The basic non-calculus mathematics for computer science in the areas of algebra, logic, combinations, and graph theory. Prerequisites: MATH 120 and  CS101.

206. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I (4 credit hours)
One and two dimensional analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, the derivative and its applications, maxima and minima, concavity, Newton's Method, integration, area, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, numerical integration, transcendental functions. Prerequisites: MATH 121 or both MATH 120 and MATH 102.

MATH 207. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS II (4 credit hours)
Applications of integration, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor's series, parametric equations, polar coordinates, conic sections. Prerequisite: MATH 206.

MATH 208. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS III (4 credit hours)
Vectors, lines and planes in space, quadric surfaces, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector calculus, multivariable functions, partial differentiation and gradients, constrained and unconstrained optimization, double and triple integrals, volume, centroids, moments of inertia, line integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 207.

MATH 222. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS FOR MATH AND NATURAL SCIENCE (3 credit hours)
Descriptive statistics, probability distributions, experiment design and sampling, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing. (Statistical software packages will be used) Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 120 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

MATH 299. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3 credit hours)
Televised courses or other courses designed for special purposes.

MATH 300. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE GEOMETRY (3 credit hours)
Advanced topics in the geometry of triangles, transformations (dilatations, similitude, inversion), foundations of geometry, theorems of Ceva and Menelaus, Desargues' configuration and duality. Prerequisite: MATH 206.

MATH 307. LINEAR ALGEBRA (3 credit hours)
Vector spaces, linear transformations, inner products, orthonomality, eigenvalue problems, system of linear equations, matrices, determinants; application. Prerequisite: MATH 207.

MATH 308. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (3 credit hours)
Axiomatic development of rings, integral domains, fields, polynomials, complex numbers, group theory Boolean algebra, isomorphism. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH 309. Introduction to the History of Mathematics (3 credit hours)
The history of mathematics from the earliest times until the 18th century, as developed in Egypt, India, China, Greece, and Europe. Prerequisite: MATH 205 and 207.

MATH 310. ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY (3 credit hours)
Induction, well-ordering principle, Euclidean Algorithm, Chinese Remainder Theorem, Fermat's and Wilson's Theorems, prime numbers, multiplicative functions, quadratic reciprocity, sum of squares, Diophantine Equations, Fermat's Last Theorem, cryptology. Prerequisite: MATH 205 and MATH 207.

MATH 315. INTRODUCTION TO COMPLEX VARIABLES (3 credit hours)
Limits, continuity and differentiation of complex variable functions, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, integration, contours, Cauchy's Integral Formula, Taylor series and Cauchy's Residue Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH 399. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3 credit hours)
A junior level course designed for a topic of special current interest, including televised courses. Prerequisite: As stated for each offering.

MATH 401. INTRODUCTION TO VECTOR ANALYSIS (3 credit hours)
Vector algebra, derivatives, space curves, line and surface integrals, transformation of coordinates, directional derivative, divergence and Stokes' theorem; applications. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH 402. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I (3 credit hours)
The types and solutions of differential equations of the first and second order. Solutions of differential equations and the application of physics and mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH 403. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY (3 credit hours)
Discrete and continuous probability models, random variables, estimation of parameters, moments, conditional probability, independence, central limit theorem, sampling distributions. Prerequisite: MATH 208 and MATH 222.

MATH 404. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3 credit hours)
Numerical solution of linear and non-linear algebraic equations and eigenvalue problems, curve fitting, interpolation theory, numerical integration, differentiation and solution of differential equations, algorithms and computer programming. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and one programming language.

MATH 405. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II (3 credit hours)
La place transform, series solutions, Bessel and Legendre equations, systems of equations, existence theorems, and numerical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 402.

MATH 406. MATHEMATICS STATISTICS (3 credit hours)
Decision theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, multiple linear regression, correlations, analysis of variance, covariance, goodness of fit tests, non-parametric tests. Prerequisites: MATH 403.

MATH 407. INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY (3 credit hours)
Set theory, cardinal numbers, orderings, continuity, homeomorphisms, convergence, separation, compactness, connectedness, completeness; topological, metric, regular, normal and Hansdorff spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH 408. SENIOR MATHEMATICS SEMINAR (1 credit hour)
Integrates the work completed in the various courses. Reading and research oriented. (To be taken in one of the last two semesters prior to graduation.)

MATH 409. ADVANCED CALCULUS I (3 credit hour)
Functions of several variables, vector functions, gradient, partial differentiation, directional derivative, multiple integrals, maxima and minima, improper integrals, line and surface integrals, divergences and Stokes' theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH 410. ADVANCED CALCULUS II (3 credit hours)
Convergence of infinite series, uniform convergence, Taylor's series, Fourier series, ordinary and partial differential equations; functions of a complex variable including integrals, power series, residues and poles, conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MATH 409.

MATH 411. TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN SECONDARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS (3 credit hours)
Review of the fundamental operations as applied to integers, fractions, and decimals; objective, methods and materials of instruction of mathematics, lesson and unit planning, classroom procedure in teaching mathematics, and use of mathematics laboratory. Prerequisite: EDUC 316, MATH 205, and MATH 300.

MATH 415. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (4 credit hours)
Ordinary differential equations, series solutions, Laplace transforms, systems of differential equations, Fourier series, partial differential equations, applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 208.
image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowResearch
Areas of Interest
 
Real-Time Embedded Systems, Energy-Efficient Computing, Software/Hardware Codesign, Statistical Analysis,  Cloud Computing,  Combinatorics (finite geometry and algebraic coding theory), Algorithms, etc.
 
Selected Presentations
 
Mr. Alemayehu Mengste presented in the 33rd IEEE International Performance Computing and Communications Conference (Poster Session) with title “Reducing (m, k)-missing rate for overloaded real-time systems”, Austin, Texas, U.S.A., Dec 5-7, 2014.

Dr. Sonya Armstrong presented in the World Congress of Psychiatry with title "a statistical analysis of a Nigerian project on autism",  September 2014.

Dr. Linwei Niu presented in the 2013 International Conference on Advanced Materials and Information Technology Processing with title “Low Power Scheduling for Embedded Real-Time Systems with Quality of Service Constraint”, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A., Oct, 2013

IMG_3727-(1).JPGIMG_3729.JPGWP_20141206_19_57_26_Pro-(1).jpg

 
Selected Publications
 
Linwei Niu, Gang Quan, "Peripheral-Conscious Scheduling for Weakly Hard Real-Time Systems", International Journal of Embedded Systems, Volume 7, No. 1, page 11-25, 2015.
 
Tianyi Wang, Linwei Niu, Shaolei Ren and Gang Quan, "Multi-Core Fixed-Priority Scheduling of Real-Time Tasks with Statistical Deadline Guarantee", IEEE/ACM Design, Automation & Test in Europe Conference (DATE’15), Grenoble, France, March 9-13, 2015.
 
Qiushi Han, Ming Fan, Linwei Niu and Gang Quan, "Energy Minimization for Fault Tolerant Scheduling of Periodic Fixed-Priority Applications on Multiprocessor Platforms", IEEE/ACM Design, Automation & Test in Europe Conference (DATE’15), Grenoble, France, March 9-13, 2015.
 
Alemayehu Mengste, Linwei Niu, "Reducing (m, k)-missing rate for overloaded real-time systems", 33rd IEEE International Performance Computing and Communications Conference (IPCCC’14 Poster Session), Austin, Texas, U.S.A., Dec 5-7, 2014.
 
Qiushi Han, Linwei Niu, Gang Quan, Shaolei Ren, Shangping Ren, "Energy efficient fault-tolerant earliest deadline first scheduling for hard real-time systems", Journal of Real-Time Systems: the International Journal of Time-Critical Computing Systems, Volume 50 Issue 5-6, pages 592-619, November, 2014
 
Linwei Niu, "Power-Low Scheduling for Real-Time Embedded Systems with QoS Constraints", WIT Transactions on Engineering Sciences, Volume 87, page 389-395, 2014.
 
Linwei Niu, "Energy-Efficient Scheduling for (m,k)-firm Real-Time Control Systems", International Journal of Automation and Power Engineering, Volume 3 Issue 1, page 28-31, January 2014
 
Linwei Niu, "Low Power Scheduling for Embedded Real-Time Systems with Quality of Service Constraints", 3rd International Conference on Advanced Materials and Information Technology Processing (AMITP’13), Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A., Oct 1-2, 2013

R. D. Baker, G. L. Ebert and K. L. Wantz, "Enumeration of Orthogonal Buekenhout Unitals , Designs, Codes and Cryptography" , 55 (2010), 261--283.

R. D. Baker, G. L. Ebert and K. L. Wantz, "Enumeration of Nonsingular Buekenhout Unitals, Note di Mathematica", 29 (2009), 69--90.

R. D. Baker, K. L. Wantz, "An arc partition of the Hughes plane using a field-theoretic model, Innovations in Incidence Geometry", 2 (2005), 83--92.

R. D. Baker, G. L. Ebert and T. Penttila, "Hyperbolic fibrations and q-clans , Designs, Codes and Cryptography", 34 (2005), 295--305.

R. D. Baker, K. L. Wantz, "Unitals in the code of the Hughes plane, J. Combinatorial Designs", 12 (2004), 35--38.

R. D. Baker, C. Culbert, G. L. Ebert and K. E. Mellinger, "Odd order flag-transitive affine planes of dimension three over their kernel , Advances in Geometry", Special Issue (2003), S215-S223.

R. D. Baker, A. Bonisoli, A. Cossidente and G. L. Ebert, "Cap partitions of the Segre variety S1,3", Discrete Mathematics , 255, (2002), 7--12. [This is the Proceedings of Combinatorics '98, Palermo, Italy .]

R. D. Baker, G. L. Ebert, Singer line orbits in PG(3,q) , "J. Statistical Planning and Inference", 95 (2001), 75--88.

R. D. Baker, G. L. Ebert, K. H. Leung, and Q. Xiang, "A trace conjecture and flag-transitive planes", J. Combinatorial Theory- Ser. A , 95 (2001), 158--168.

R. D. Baker, G. L. Ebert and K. L. Wantz, "Regular hyperbolic fibrations, Advances in Geometry", 1 (2001), 119--144.

R. D. Baker, J. M. Dover, G. L. Ebert, and K. L. Wantz, "Perfect Baer subplane partitions and three-dimensional flag-transitive planes , Designs, Codes and Cryptography", 21, (2000), 19-39.

R. D. Baker, J. M. Dover, G. L. Ebert, and K. L. Wantz, "Baer subgeometry partitions", J. Geometry, 67, (2000), 23--34.
image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowClubs

Math & CS Club

Please contact Dr. Xiaohong Zhang or Mr. Danford Smith to learn more about the Math & CS club of the Department of Mathmatics and Computer Science.

image-up-arrowimage-down-arrowScholarships

Kathryn Lynch Scholarship

Please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, the Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science for more information on it.

Faculty & Staff

Dr. MichaelAnderson
Dr. Michael Anderson
Professor & Dept. Chair
Phone: (304) 766-3393
andersmr@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Sonya
Dr. Sonya Armstrong
Professor
Phone: (304) 766-3390
armstrso@wvstateu.edu
Dr. RonaldBaker
Dr. Ronald Baker
Professor
Phone: (304) 766-3397
baker@wvstateu.edu
Dr. MohammadBhuiyan
Dr. Mohammad Bhuiyan
Assitant Professor of Civil Engineering (Chair)
Phone: (304) 766-3087
towhid@wvstateu.edu
Kumara
Kumara Jayasuriya, Ph.D.
Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs
Phone: (304) 766-3146
kjayasuriya@wvstateu.edu
 Ms. KarenKail
Ms. Karen Kail
Instructor
Phone: (304) 766-3396
kkail@wvstateu.edu
Dr. UpaliKarunathilake
Dr. Upali Karunathilake
Associate Professor
Phone: (304) 766-3244
ukarunathil@wvstateu.edu
Mr. LarryLamb
Mr. Larry Lamb
Instructor
Phone: (304) 766-3399
tribe_math@yahoo.com
Dr. Linwei
Dr. Linwei Niu
Associate Professor
Phone: (304) 766-3024
lniu@wvstateu.edu
Mrs. D. JeannieStarr
Mrs. D. Jeannie Starr
Administrative Secretary Sr.
Phone: (304) 766-3267
stardj@wvstateu.edu
Dr. Naveed
Dr. Naveed Zaman
Interim Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Phone: (304) 766-4248
zamanna@wvstateu.edu
Dr. XiaohongZhang
Dr. Xiaohong Zhang
Associate Professor
Phone: (304) 766-3398
zhangxi@wvstateu.edu
Dr. XiZhao
Dr. Xi Zhao
Assistant Professor
Phone: (304) 766-3072
xi.zhao@wvstateu.edu
lecture on mathematics and computer science
Dr. MichaelAnderson
Dr. Michael Anderson
Professor & Dept. Chair
Monday: 1:00-3:00
Tuesday: 9:30-11:30
Wednesday: 1:00-3:00
Thursday: 9:30-11:30
817 Wallace Hall
Phone: (304) 766-3393
andersmr@wvstateu.edu
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